Drake’s 24 Hours Challenge or How to Be Less Negative

awareness, emotions, empathy, soft-skills

Did you ever look at the chunk of code that is not very pretty, and immediately uttered some bad word or bad remark, such as “Who wrote this?” And not even noticed it?

Or did you ever had an incident happening in production, and half of your vocabulary at that time was not normative? Also, did you feel stressed and down afterward?

Or did you ever had to converse with a difficult person or someone holding a strong opinion, and thought not very good about them? Or even dismissed a valid argument just because you didn’t like the conversation?

Did you ever felt or did something negative, and thought afterward that it would be better not to? Then the technique described in this article is perfect for you!

Build Your Own Testing Framework. Part 6: Test Suite Does Not Run All Tests!

build-your-own-testing-framework, javascript, tdd, test-driven-development, testing, xunit

Welcome back to the new issue of “Build Your Own Testing Framework” series! When trying to implement better formatting, we have discovered that some of our test suites do not run all tests! Today we are going to fix that, and we will make sure that such test suite will fail if it didn’t execute all tests.

Learning Test-Driven Development With Javascript: End-to-End Testing

javascript, learning-tdd-with-js, tdd, tutorial

Level: Beginner.

“Learning TDD with Javascript” is the series of articles where we learn basics of automated testing and test-driven development. While the language of choice for the code examples is Javascript, all described concepts are language-agnostic and are applicable in various technological stacks. In these articles, a reader is expected to do small exercises after each major topic to reinforce that theoretical knowledge with practice. Some of these exercises are practical and will involve coding, or simple writing; others will be food for thought. Also, a reader might want to get their feedback on these exercises, so don’t hesitate to send the results my way: oleksii@tddfellow.com - feedback on the practice is quite important as it helps to improve quicker, when you know what is well and what can be improved and how. Also, don’t hesitate to send any questions and feedback regarding the content of these articles. Your questions, feedback, and your practical results will help authors shape this content better.

Today we are going to learn how to write tests that imitate real user interaction for the whole application. We are going to build a small web application using Vanilla Javascript. Vanilla Javascript is a plain Javascript without any framework or library. Such tests that imitate real user interaction via User Interface (UI) are called End-to-End Tests. These tests are the most simple to write because we only need to think about our application in the same way user does:

  • Imitating the user clicking on the button would mean for us to trigger a button click;
  • Imitating the user typing text in the input field would mean for us to change input’s value;
  • Imitating the user clicking on the link would mean for us to trigger a link click;
  • And so on.

Mobile Waterfall. Being Agile Again

agile, android, dsl, ios, microservices, mobile, waterfall

Have you ever worked with mobile platforms, such as Apple Store or Google Play? How much time it takes to release a new version of the application? They have ~2-4 days manual review of your mobile application. What do you think that means? - You can release your application to production no often than two times a week. It became much better around this year - before it was 1-1.5 weeks.

waterfall

Understanding Legacy Code Using Explorative Test-Driven Development Technique

legacy-code, ruby, tdd, test-driven-development, testing

Today we are going to learn how to eliminate the fear of changing legacy code. We will learn how to confidently and in small iterations understand the legacy code better while increasing the test coverage in the process. While code examples are in Ruby programming language, the technique applied is language-agnostic.

Build Your Own Testing Framework. Part 5

build-your-own-testing-framework, javascript, tdd, test-driven-development, testing, xunit

Welcome back to the new issue of “Build Your Own Testing Framework” series! Did you notice, that out testing framework quits on the first failure? It probably should run all tests, collect all failures and present them nicely. This is what we are going to accomplish today:

  • Make sure all tests run even when there is a failure.
  • Make sure exit code is correct.